The Right Fit: Choosing Running Shoes

The Right Fit: Choosing the Perfect Running Shoes

With the warm weather coming soon, the sidewalks and pathways will be packed with runners. But before you head to your next run, it’s important to make sure you have the right shoes.

Check out our tips on how to choose the right shoes to support your feet while running. 

What’s the difference?

Sure, picking out your everyday shoes might be more about the look than the function. And depending on how much you value comfort, that might outrank style for you. But when it comes to running shoes, there’s a big difference. Most importantly, pick shoes that offer enough space to accommodate the width of your foot. Think about how your mom tested your shoes out when you were school shopping – account for one thumb-width between the end of the longest toe and the end of the shoe. (And women should consider squared or rounded toes, rather than pointed ones.)

What arch is best?

First, you must determine what type of foot, or more specifically what type of arch you have: low, medium, or high. You should always measure your arch height when you’re standing to avoid an inaccurate measurement. Arch height will determine the shape of the shoe needed, also known as the “last”. The last of the shoe is the amount of curve on the bottom of the shoe. Shoes are built on a straight, semi-curved, or curved last. Identifying your foot type can also help you figure out how much cushioning or support you will need.

Don’t skimp on analyzing the arch of your foot when it comes to picking out running shoes. Even the way you run has an affect on which type of shoe to select. Inspect the shoe you’ve been running in for the following:

  • Wear primarily around the ball of the foot and secondarily the heel is often indicative of a flat-arched foot. This is usually a more mobile foot, also referred to as a pronated foot. This foot has the potential to allow too much motion and needs a more supportive shoe that offers better motion control and stability.
  • Wear primarily along the outer edge of the shoot usually hints at a high-arched foot. This is usually a more rigid, stable foot, also called a supinated foot. This type of foot needs more cushioning inherent in the shoe to provide for better absorption of shock to prevent injuries to the feet and legs.

If all else fails and your wear pattern isn’t speaking to you, another way to tell is by having a running analysis done by a trained professional. (And the pros at Orthopedic Institute can certainly help you identify your desirable arch as well.)

What about the price?

That price tag can be a little scary – but the saying is true: “You get what you pay for.” Buying the cheapest running shoes you can find will likely mean you’ll need to replace them sooner or you’ll suffer the consequences from the poor support. Investing a little more traditionally ensures you’re getting the best quality materials and construction. Don’t worry – you won’t have to drop $200 on a pair of shoes. Good athletic trainers (running shoes) run anywhere from $80-150. 

Common Foot Problems: Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is a common cause of heel pain. This chronic problem is an inflammation of the plantar fascia, a ligament-like structure that passes from the heel to the forefoot. The inflammation is caused by the fascia partially tearing or pulling away from the heel. A bony spur may also develop where the fascia and heel bone meet.

Self-care includes over the counter arch supports or heel pads, exercises, massage and heat or ice.

Doctor’s care may involve anti-inflammatory medications, custom-made orthotic supports or heel cups, night splints, physical therapy, and, if necessary, a cortisone injection. Complete recovery may take months.

Surgery can be performed to release the fascia in severe cases. It can be done traditionally (open surgery) or endoscopically (using a telescope-like instrument and small incisions).

If your foot flattens too much, the plantar fascia may overstretch and become inflamed.

If your foot doesn’t flatten, the plantar fascia may be pulled too tight, eventually causing pain.

What Orthopedic Institute offers with pedorthic care:

  • Custom Orthotics
  • Running/Walking Analysis
  • Shoe Recommendations
  • Diabetic Foot Care
  • Amputee Foot/Toe Filler
  • Custom Bracing/ AFO
  • Shoe Modifications
  • External/Internal Heel Lifts

Dr. Watson specializes in foot and ankle medicine, and also general orthopedics.  He completed his fellowship in foot and ankle surgery at GIKK in Omaha and the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

Reid Herrboldt, MS, ATC, CPED

Our pedorthist, Reid Herrboldt, has many years of field experience and specializes in diabetic care, athletics, and pediatric care for orthotics and bracing.

To make an appointment to see one of our specialists please call 605.331.5890 or 888.331.5890 E-mail: contactus@ortho-i.com

Common Foot Problems: Heel Pain

Heel pain is a common problem that can affect people of all ages. Over time, problems with the way you walk or stand can cause painful changes in ligaments and other tissues. The heel and ankle bones can be affected too. Heel pain also can result from an injury or a health problem, such as arthritis, that affects the entire body.

Self-care includes warm soaks and rest. Wear shoes that support your arches and have cushioned insoles. Stretching exercises and massage may also help.

Doctor’s care may involve oral medication to reduce inflammation, and stretching exercises. To relieve pressure, you may be given a special pad to wear in the heel of your shoe, or a removable heel cup or other orthotic support. If these methods don’t work, you may be given a cortisone injection.

Surgery is not common.

What Orthopedic Institute offers with pedorthic care:

  • Custom Orthotics
  • Running/Walking Analysis
  • Shoe Recommendations
  • Diabetic Foot Care
  • Amputee Foot/Toe Filler
  • Custom Bracing/ AFO
  • Shoe Modifications
  • External/Internal Heel Lifts

Dr. Watson specializes in foot and ankle medicine, and also general orthopedics. He completed his fellowship in foot and ankle surgery at GIKK in Omaha and the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

Reid Herrboldt, MS, ATC, CPED

Our pedorthist, Reid Herrboldt, has many years of field experience and specializes in diabetic care, athletics, and pediatric care for orthotics and bracing.

To make an appointment to see one of our specialists please call 605.331.5890 or 888.331.5890 E-mail: contactus@ortho-i.com

Common Foot Problems: Hallux Rigidus

Hallux rigidus at base of right big toe

Hallux rigidus is characterized by loss of motion, pain, redness, and swelling at the base of the big toe. It’s a chronic condition caused by arthritis, often brought on by an old injury.

Doctor’s care may include using pads and an oral medication to relieve the inflammation, or cortisone may be injected directly into the joint.

Surgery is performed in severe cases. Bony spurs and part of the joint at the base of the big toe may be removed. Sometimes the joint is fused, rebuilt, or replaced.

What Orthopedic Institute offers with pedorthic care:

  • Custom Orthotics
  • Running/Walking Analysis
  • Shoe Recommendations
  • Diabetic Foot Care
  • Amputee Foot/Toe Filler
  • Custom Bracing/ AFO
  • Shoe Modifications
  • External/Internal Heel Lifts

Dr. Watson specializes in foot and ankle medicine, and also general orthopedics. He completed his fellowship in foot and ankle surgery at GIKK in Omaha and the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

Reid Herrboldt, MS, ATC, CPED

Our pedorthist, Reid Herrboldt, has many years of field experience and specializes in diabetic care, athletics, and pediatric care for orthotics and bracing.

To make an appointment to see one of our specialists please call 605.331.5890 or 888.331.5890 E-mail: contactus@ortho-i.com

Common Foot Problems: Bunions/Bunionette

Bunion X-ray

A bunion is an unsightly bump at the base of the big toe. Because bunions don’t fit most shoes, the skin in the area can become irritated and swollen.  Bunions, hammer toes, and metatarsalgia often appear together. Although bunions tend to be hereditary, wearing shoes with too narrow a forefoot or too high a heel can bring bunions on years sooner. Sometimes bunions develop with arthritis.

Self-care begins with wearing shoes that have a low heel and don’t cramp your bunion. You may be able to have shoes stretched to fit a bunion.  If your symptoms don’t improve, see a foot specialist.

Doctor’s care may start with recommendations about specific changes to your regular shoes, such as wearing shoes with a wider forefoot or using devices such as pads. If these measures fail, you might consider surgery.

Surgery involves realigning the big toe. Part of the first metatarsal bone may be removed or reconstructed. A wire may hold the new alignment. You may have a walking boot or surgical shoe.

Bunionette

Bunionette is like a bunion, but occurs at the base of the little toe. Treatment may include wearing shoes with a wider fore-foot.

Surgery involves the removal of the bony prominence.

What Orthopedic Institute offers with pedorthic care:

  • Custom Orthotics
  • Running/Walking Analysis
  • Shoe Recommendations
  • Diabetic Foot Care
  • Amputee Foot/Toe Filler
  • Custom Bracing/ AFO
  • Shoe Modifications
  • External/Internal Heel Lifts

Dr. Watson specializes in foot and ankle medicine, and also general orthopedics.  He completed his fellowship in foot and ankle surgery at GIKK in Omaha and the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

Reid Herrboldt, MS, ATC, CPED

Our pedorthist, Reid Herrboldt, has many years of field experience and specializes in diabetic care, athletics, and pediatric care for orthotics and bracing.

To make an appointment to see one of our specialists please call 605.331.5890 or 888.331.5890 E-mail: contactus@ortho-i.com

June 3 Is World Clubfoot Day

Ponseti International Association (PIA) has designated June 3rd as World Clubfoot Day. The date was chosen to commemorate the birthdate of Dr. Ignacio Ponseti, (1914-2009) the developer of the Ponseti Method to treat clubfoot.

The goal of World Clubfoot Day is to raise awareness about clubfoot disability and its prevention using the Ponseti Method, a non-surgical treatment that includes gentle manipulation of the feet followed by the application of plaster casts and temporary bracing.

Dr. Jose Morcuende, CEO and Medical Director of Ponseti International, says this day is an important step in furthering global awareness that clubfoot is a treatable deformity. “By designating June 3 as World Clubfoot Day, not only do we celebrate the life and contributions of Dr. Ponseti, but we help further his belief that every child born with clubfoot is entitled to treatment using this low-cost, non-surgical approach.”

Clubfoot is the most common musculoskeletal birth deformity, affecting 200,000 newborn children each year, 80 percent in developing countries. There are also hundreds of thousands of children and young adults who are living with this debilitating condition worldwide. The Ponseti Method is nearly 100 percent effective when properly applied by a trained health care provider and is considered the “gold standard” treatment, leading to a normal, productive life.

PIA is the global leader in training and educating healthcare providers on the treatment of congenital clubfoot.

Dr. Walter Carlson belongs to the Ponseti International Association and uses this method to treat children with clubfoot.

Slip and Fall Prevention Strategies

With winter in full swing, it is important for you and your family to be aware of slip and fall prevention strategies.

  • Walk cautiously and wear gloves instead of putting your hands in your pockets. Your arms help keep you balanced and if you slip, you will need them to help restore your balance.
  • Wear the proper footwear. Footwear with rubber or neoprene composite soles provides better traction on ice and snow than leather or plastic. Although it may not be glamorous to wear a pair of boots, it will give you traction and keep your feet warm. If you want to wear heels or other kinds of shoes, bring an extra pair with you to change in to.
  • When you step on icy areas, take short, shuffling steps, curl your toes under and walk as flatfooted as possible. Spread your feet out slightly like a penguin. Walking like a penguin on ice increases your center of gravity.
  • Avoid carrying large loads while walking on snow or ice. If you do carrying a load on an icy walk and feel yourself falling, toss it out of the way so that you can try to break your fall.
  • Many injuries occur when entering or exiting a vehicle. When possible, use handrails, handles – anything that will help you keep your balance.
  • Help your elderly friends and relatives on snow and ice. Slips and falls can be extremely dangerous for seniors. If you are older, don’t shy away from asking others for a helping hand.
  • If you are falling, do not put all the pressure on your wrists to break your fall. Putting too much pressure on your wrists can result in wrist breaks and fractures of the elbow and hand. If you feel yourself starting to fall, try to avoid landing on your knees, wrists or back. Try to fall on a fleshy part of your body, such as your side. If you are able to relax your muscles when you fall, you may injure yourself less.

 

If you experience an injury while falling, or develop pain that persists after falling, please feel free to schedule an appointment with one of our specialists at Orthopedic Institute to determine the type of injury and its severity.

(888.331.5890)

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Don’t Let a Fall from a Ladder Ruin Your Holiday Season

Dr. Eric S. Watson, M.D.

The holidays are right around the corner. Do you have your decorations up? If not, you might be tempted to do it soon.

Dr. Eric Watson, a lower extremity specialist with Orthopedic Institute in Sioux Falls, recommends everyone take extreme caution when using a ladder this holiday season.

According to the World Health Organization, the United States leads the world in ladder deaths. Each year, there are more than 164,000 emergency room-treated injuries and 300 deaths in the U.S. that are caused by falls from ladders

“I have worked with patients who fell from ladders on multiple occasions,” said Watson. “It generally takes six weeks for a foot or ankle injury to heal, but that is after the surgery. Most cases are surgical but we have to wait to complete the surgery until the swelling has gone down. A foot or ankle injury could really ruin your holiday season.”

Watson said the most common injuries he sees are broken ankles and feet, but it all depends on how a person falls.

“If you jump off and land on your feet you’re probably going to do some damage to your feet or ankles, but if you land on your hands, you can harm your wrists, hands or arms,” he said. “You could also fall on your back and hurt your head or neck.”

Oftentimes, falls cause injuries in several areas, Watson said.

“There is almost always an associated injury to go with the broken bones,” he said. “A common one is a compound compression fracture in your back, which is very painful.”

Watson offered these tips to avoid injuries while working on ladders:

  • Always inspect the ladder to make sure it is in good working condition. “Make sure there is no excess mud on the rungs that could cause you to slip and make sure all the ladder components are working properly,” he said.
  • Always place ladders on a level surface. “Make sure the hinges are locked out and the legs are as level as possible,” Watson said.
  • Always face the ladder when climbing and wear clothing that allows you to keep a good grip on the rungs.
  • Place the ladder as close to where you’ll be working as possible. “You don’t want to have to reach off the ladder very far,” Watson said. “The further from the center of gravity you are, the more likely you’ll tip the ladder.”
  • If possible, have someone hold the ladder. “This is especially important if you don’t have a good, level surface,” he said.
  • Never step on the top rung or the paint bucket shelf. “Do exactly as the label says and stay off,” he said. “(Ladder manufacturers) really mean it; the warning labels are there for a reason.”
  • Use a job-appropriate ladder. “You don’t need to use a 14-foot ladder to reach up three feet,” he said. “The higher up you are, the more worried you should get because the ladder will be less stable. Make sure your ladder is the appropriate height for the job.”

Some common sense and a bit of planning will go a long way in preventing ladder injuries, Watson said. “The old adage, ‘An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,’ is certainly true here,” he said.